General Surgery

Institutes & Services > Robotic Surgery

The expert surgeons at TriHealth are skilled with many surgical approaches, including robotic-assisted. The surgeons have extensive experience using robotic-assisted to treat both cancerous and non-cancerous conditions. In fact, they have performed over 2,200 robotic-assisted procedures. Those procedures are done to treat conditions affecting the esophagus, colon, rectum, pancreas, gallbladder, liver, stomach, spleen, and various types of hernias. In addition, TriHealth is the only robotic-assisted option in Greater Cincinnati to offer a complex procedure known as a Whipple (procedure used to treat pancreatic conditions). Trust the experience and expertise of our surgeons to help you choose the best course of treatment for your specific needs.

Conditions Affecting the:

  • Colon
  • Esophagus
  • Gallbladder
  • Hernia
  • Rectum
  • Pancreas/Liver/Biliary Tree
  • Spleen
  • Stomach
  • Colon

    While robotic-assisted technology is used to treat both cancerous and non-cancerous conditions, the most common colon surgery is the removal of all or part of the colon due to cancer. In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost all colon cancers start in the lining of the colon and rectum. When doctors talk about colorectal cancer, this is usually what they are talking about. There is no single cause of colon cancer. Nearly all colon cancers begin as noncancerous (benign) polyps, which slowly develop into cancer.

    Robotic-assisted surgery is a minimally-invasive technique that uses a stable platform, allowing enhanced dexterity, improved vision with the use of a 3-Dimensional camera, and may add greater precision to the surgeon's movement. The surgeons at TriHealth have extensive experience using robotic-assisted technology to treat colon conditions.

    Laparoscopic surgery is also a minimally-invasive option that utilizes a camera and small instruments to treat colon conditions. Similar to robotic-assisted technology, the surgeons at TriHealth have extensive experience using this minimally-invasive technique. Together, you and your surgeon will help decide which option is best for your condition.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats cancerous and non-cancerous colon conditions.

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    Esophagus

    While robotic-assisted technology is used to treat both cancerous and non-cancerous conditions, it is especially useful for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types look different from each other under the microscope.

    Squamous cell esophageal cancer is linked to smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Adenocarcinoma is the more common type of esophageal cancer. Having Barrett esophagus increases the risk of this type of cancer. Acid reflux disease (gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD) can develop into Barrett esophagus. Other risk factors include smoking, being male, or being obese."

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy is surgery to remove part or all of the esophagus. This is the tube that moves food from your throat to your stomach. After it is removed, the esophagus is rebuilt from part of your stomach or part of your large intestine.

    Most of the time, esophagectomy is done to treat cancer of the esophagus. The surgery may also be done to treat the esophagus if it is no longer working to move food into the stomach.

    The surgeons at TriHealth can use both robotic-assisted and traditional laparoscopic approaches to perform this surgery.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats cancerous and non-cancerous esophageal conditions. 

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    Gallbladder

    Gallbladder disease, including cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder), cholelithiasis (gallstones), and biliary dyskinesia (biliary motility disorder) can all be treated by removing the gallbladder.

    Robotic-assisted single-site gallbladder removal is a minimally invasive option used to treat gallbladder disease. The single-site option, which refers to a single, one inch incision inside the bellow button, offers many advantages. The surgeons at TriHealth have completed more single-site gallbladder removals than any other health system in Greater Cincinnati.

    In addition to the single-site option for gallbladder removal, TriHealth surgeons can perform your surgery using a different robotic-assisted approach called multiport gallbladder removal, and are also skilled using the laparoscopic technique, both of which are minimally-invasive options.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats gallbladder conditions.

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    Hernia

    There are many types of hernias, which is defined as a hole in the wall of muscle or tissue. TriHealth surgeons have experience in treating all types of hernias, and use robotic-assisted technology to treat ventral, inguinal (sports), and umbilical hernias.

    If the robotic-assisted technique is the best fit for you, the surgeon will make 3-4 very small incisions and make all of the necessary repairs through those incisions. The laparoscopic technique also uses very few small incisions in order to make all necessary repairs.

    TriHealth is also home to a Hernia Center.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats hernias.

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    Rectum

    Robotic-assisted surgery is a minimally-invasive technique that uses a stable platform, allowing enhanced dexterity, improved vision with the use of a 3-Dimensional camera, and may add greater precision to the surgeon's movement. The surgeons at TriHealth have extensive experience using robotic-assisted technology to treat colon conditions.

    Laparoscopic surgery is also a minimally-invasive option that utilizes a camera and small instruments to treat colon conditions. Similar to robotic-assisted technology, the surgeons at TriHealth have extensive experience using this minimally-invasive technique. Together, you and your surgeon will help decide which option is best for your condition.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats cancerous and non-cancerous colon conditions.

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    Pancreas/Liver/Biliary Tree

    There are a variety of conditions related to the pancreas, liver, and biliary tree, including cancerous and non-cancerous. While surgery is a possible treatment method for these conditions, it is likely that patients will require non-surgical treatment before and/or after surgery, especially for cancerous conditions. An example of the conditions that can be treated through the HPB Surgery Program include: pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, & cholangiocarcinoma (bile duct cancer).

    While each surgical treatment is different, the surgeons at TriHealth are skilled in the use of minimally invasive surgical techniques, including robotic-assisted. If robotic-assisted surgical treatment is the best option to treat your condition, the surgeons at TriHealth will use 4-5 small incisions in your abdomen to complete the procedure.

    TriHealth is home to the only Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary (HPB) Surgery Program in Cincinnati.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats both cancerous and non-cancerous pancreas, liver, and biliary tree conditions. 

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    Spleen

    The spleen is an organ in the upper part of the bell, on the left side underneath the rib cage. The spleen has roles in filtering blood and fighting infections. Conditions that may require surgery to remove the spleen include blood clots, idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), and hypersplenism.

    While surgery to remove the spleen is rare, your condition may result in the need for a splenectomy. During the surgery, your surgeon will make 4-5 small incisions in your abdomen and perform the procedure.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats both cancerous and non-cancerous pancreas conditions.  

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    Stomach

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly known as GERD, is a condition in which food or stomach acid come back from your stomach into the esophagus. Symptoms include burning in the stomach, throat, or chest, burping or gas bubbles, and/or trouble swallowing foods or liquids. Symptoms can worsen when the stomach bulges through an opening in the diaphragm into the chest, which is known as a hiatal hernia.

    The most common surgical treatment for this condition is called a Nissen Fundoplication. During this procedure, your surgeon will use a technique to create pressure at the end of your esophagus which will prevent stomach acid and food from flowing back into the esophagus. If a hiatal hernia is present, your surgeon will also repair this hole during the same procedure.

    Find a TriHealth surgeon who treats both cancerous and non-cancerous pancreas conditions.  

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